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Kelly Acharya, MD

Start Year: 
2016

I did my residency at Duke and had wonderful experiences working with the REI faculty, both during my clinical rotations, as well as while doing research with the Duke REI team, which is why I chose Duke for my Fellowship. I was impressed by the knowledgeable faculty, exciting research, and mostly by how warm and welcoming everyone was.

Education & Training

  • University of North Carolina, MD, 2012
  • Duke University, Residency, 2016

Awards & Achievements

  • 2006 Suma cum laude graduation, Clemson University Honors College - Clemson, SC
  • 2009 NIDDK Research Grant - UNC Chapel Hill
  • 2010-2012 John B Graham Research Society - UNC Chapel Hill
  • 2012 Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society - UNC Chapel Hill
  • 2012 Doctor of Medicine with Honors - UNC Chapel Hill
  • 2012 Women in Medicine Achievement Award - UNC Chapel Hill
  • 2014 Charles Hammond Research Grant – Duke Univ, Durham, NC
  • 2014 Suheil and Lisa Muasher Award for Outstanding Resident in Reproductive Endocrinology
  • 2015 Chief Resident, Duke University OB/GYN – Durham, NC

Research Interests

I am very interested in the effect of the environment on fertility, as well as the genetic and epigenetic impact on fertility. I am currently working with Susan Murphy, Ph.D, in the Division of Reproductive Sciences to perform research on the effect of cannabis exposure to the sperm epigenome and whether those effects are carried on to future generations as intergenerational and transgenerational epigenetic changes. I am also very interested in patient characteristics and how these impact success rates of in vitro fertilization (IVF); I have performed this database research with Dr. Suheil Muasher.  

Research Career Goals

I hope to pursue a career in academic Reproductive Endocrinology and contribute to the field of REI through clinical work, teaching, and research.

Publications

  1. Acharya KS, Keyhan S, Acharya CR, Yeh JS, Provost MP, Goldfard JM, Muasher SJ. Do donor oocyte cycles comply with ASRM/SART embryo transfer guidelines? An analysis of 13,393 donor cycles from the SART registry. Fertil Steril. 2016 Jun 4. [Epub ahead of print].
  2. Keyhan S, Acharya KS, Acharya CR, Yeh JS, Provost MP, Goldfarb JM, Muasher SJ. How compliant are in vitro fertilization member clinics in following embryo transfer guidelines? An analysis of 59,689 fresh first in vitro fertilization autologous cycles from 2011 to 2012. Fertil Steril. 2016 Jun 4. [Epub ahead of print].
  3. Acharya KS, Acharya CR, Provost MP, Yeh JS, Steward RG, Eaton JL, Muasher SJ. Ectopic pregnancy rate increases with the number of retrieved oocytes in autologous in vitro fertilization with non-tubal infertility but not donor/recipient cycles: an analysis of 109,140 clinical pregnancies from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry. Fertil Steril. 2015 Oct; 104(4): 873-8.
  4. Provost MP, Acharya KS, Acharya CR, Yeh JS, Steward RG, Eaton JL, Goldfarb JM, Muasher SJ. Pregnancy outcomes decline with increasing body mass index: analysis of 239,127 fresh autologous in vitro fertilization cycles from the 2008-2010 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry. Fertil Steril. 2016 Mar; 105 (3): 663-9.
  5. Provost MP, Acharya KS, Acharya CR, Yeh JS, Steward RG, Eaton JL, Goldfarb JM, Muasher SJ. Pregnancy outcomes decline with increasing recipient body mass index: an analysis of 22,317 fresh donor/recipient cycles from the 2008-2010 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System registry. Fertil Steril. 2016 Feb; 105 (2): 364-8.
  6. Acharya KS, Provost MP, Yeh JS, Acharya CR, Muasher SJ. Ectopic pregnancy rates in frozen versus fresh embryo transfer in in vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Middle East Fertility Society Journal 2014; 19(4): 233-238.